Job and CF

A new job or training always brings with it new challenges. With the growing average age of the CF community, more and more people are taking up a job. CF and job is certainly not the easiest combination. 

Does my employer need to know?

Here I have a very clear opinion. As long as CF does not influence the quality and quantity in the job, I have the opinion that the employer does not have to be informed. However, if you are often ill or absent, then I recommend it to you. When I started my new job, I didn't mention anything. Two years later, when a wave of infections came, I informed my boss. This was not a problem. 

It can happen (from personal experience) that a questionnaire on health must be completed (e.g. in Switzerland because of the pension fund). However, this is confidential and will not be communicated to your boss. In this case, however, it is important that you mention the CF. Otherwise this can lead to legal consequences.

How to tell my employer?

The employer does not need to know everything in detail. Whether you have a pancreatic insufficiency does not matter. Be open and honest, but tell the whole story with a positive touch. Explain what CF has taught you in life, why it makes you what you are. Maybe there is something that will help you in your job (e.g. more serious approach to things, appreciate small things more, sense of responsibility, etc.). Inform also about your checks in the hospital, for which you will be missing. In addition, most CF doctors are willing to inform a new employer by phone. If you have an information brochure about CF, you can also hand it in to your employer. 

How to tell my colleagues?

Either the situation arises automatically or you can inform the people in the team at a session. For me personally this is always a little unpleasant, so I always wait for a suitable moment. Again, you don't have to go into too much detail. Don't forget the positive touch, people like positive charisma and will have a completely different picture of you. I've never had any problems, one or two stupid sayings about coughing or something, but I think we can handle it.

Does my employer need to know?

Here I have a very clear opinion. As long as CF does not influence the quality and quantity in the job, I have the opinion that the employer does not have to be informed. However, if you are often ill or absent, then I recommend it to you. When I started my new job, I didn't mention anything. Two years later, when a wave of infections came, I informed my boss. This was not a problem. 

It can happen (from personal experience) that a questionnaire on health must be completed (e.g. in Switzerland because of the pension fund). However, this is confidential and will not be communicated to your boss. In this case, however, it is important that you mention the CF. Otherwise this can lead to legal consequences.

How to tell my employer?

The employer does not need to know everything in detail. Whether you have a pancreatic insufficiency does not matter. Be open and honest, but tell the whole story with a positive touch. Explain what CF has taught you in life, why it makes you what you are. Maybe there is something that will help you in your job (e.g. more serious approach to things, appreciate small things more, sense of responsibility, etc.). Inform also about your checks in the hospital, for which you will be missing. In addition, most CF doctors are willing to inform a new employer by phone. If you have an information brochure about CF, you can also hand it in to your employer. 

How to tell my colleagues?

Either the situation arises automatically or you can inform the people in the team at a session. For me personally this is always a little unpleasant, so I always wait for a suitable moment. Again, you don't have to go into too much detail. Don't forget the positive touch, people like positive charisma and will have a completely different picture of you. I've never had any problems, one or two stupid sayings about coughing or something, but I think we can handle it.

A few questions and answers

In principle, we are discouraged from jobs with heavy physical work (such as construction, mining, etc.). I would also have reservations about anything that has to do with soil (gardener, etc.) or where fine particles could be inhaled (painter, carpenter, etc.). Diving instructor and bungee instructor are also not the best ones for us. If this is your dream job, you are sure to find a way to combine it with CF. 

If you're doing fine, no problem. If it affects your daily work, it may seem suspicious if you miss a lot without a reason. With some companies it can also be an actuarial problem (e.g. pension fund retention in Switzerland) if you do not inform. 

Not a simple question you're asking. Depends very much on your state of health. I work 100% myself, but I also feel that I am neglecting my therapy. I think 60-80% would give you enough time to take care of your CF. Under 60% you can apply for IV in Switzerland. 

Absolutely not. That you work and have CF is a masterstroke and not self-evident. Be proud of it. If your team is properly informed, they will meet you with a lot of understanding. In my office there are people who are "healthy" and miss much more than me.

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